Examples of Students Essays

Case study Essay Example

Case study Essay – Part 4

Jane wants to setup a photo shop – Case study Essay introduction. The cost to rent an office is $150 per week. The variable cost of making one photo is $20 and she can sell it for $50.

1. Jane has to sell _5_ photos per week to break even. (Please only enter an integer and include no units.)

Jane wants to setup a photo shop. The cost to rent an office is $150 per week. The variable cost of making one photo is $20 and she can sell it for $50.

2. If Jane sells 10 units, her profits would be __150__dollars. (Please only enter an integer and include no units.)

Paul wants to choose one of the two investment opportunities over three possible scenarios. Investment 1 will yield a return of $10,000 in Scenario 1, $2,000 in Scenario 2, and a negative return of -$5,000 in Scenario 3. Investment 2 will yield a return of $6,000 in Scenario 1, $4,000 in Scenario 2, and zero in Scenario 3. The probability for Scenario 1 is 0.2, for Scenario 2 is 0.3, and for Scenario 3 is 0.5.

3. If you were to choose the investment that maximizes Paul’s Expected Money Value (EMV), then you should choose __________.

A.Investment 1

B.Investment 2

C.Indifferent

Paul wants to choose one of the two investment opportunities over three possible scenarios. Investment 1 will yield a return of $10,000 in Scenario 1, $2,000 in Scenario 2, and a negative return of -$5,000 in Scenario 3. Investment 2 will yield a return of $6,000 in Scenario 1, $4,000 in Scenario 2, and zero in Scenario 3. The probability for Scenario 1 is 0.2, for Scenario 2 is 0.3, and for Scenario 3 is 0.5.

4. If Paul is uncertain about the return for Investment 1 in Scenario 1, then this return has to be __21500___ dollars in order to make Paul indifferent between these two investments (i.e. the two investments would have the same EMV.) (Please only enter an integer and include no units.) Sam has a cleaning service. To better allocate his resources, he would like to forecast his weekly orders based on the order number he received in…

My future employment opportunities Essay – Part 4

That was the extreme consequence she could have faced and it shouldn’t eave been taken that far – My future employment opportunities Essay introduction. They could have easily told her to take it off or Just tell her to make her profile private so that her students wouldn’t be able to see her profile. She should have gotten her degree because she did everything required to do so. Although she may not get a Job from an employer who sees that picture, she should still get her degree from the school. I think that employers should have the full extent of looking at peoples social networks.

Just because thieve have a couple pictures of them drinking or attending parties does not mean that they will not benefit your many. It only means that some people are more open about their social life and willing to share that with the world. As long as you are able to take care of the work at your Job and help your employers, what you do on your leisure time shouldn’t affect anything. There is nothing currently on my Backbone because I cleaned it all up last year when I started learning how it can affect my future employment opportunities. ) The webmasters of funerals is an interesting example of the flatness of the world. Is this an Invasion of privacy or do next-of-kin have the right to make such a decision? What other significant events in a person’s life might be suitable for webmasters? Identify at least three such events and then do some research to determine If webmasters of those events Is already taking place. I don’t think at all that this Is invasion of privacy if the family says that is okay for them to do so.

More Essay Examples on

It might even be beneficial if friends and families from other states cannot get there for whatever reasons. I think that three events that should be webmaster are Marriages, births, and sporting events. Surprisingly they actually have done webmasters for all of the above. The birth webbing’s are more personal though and I’m pretty sure not Just anyone can see them. For sporting events I was talking of sporting events more for kids. Sometimes relatives that live far away would want to see their younger family members play but can because of the distance. ) Osama Bal Laden represents a very dark Image for most Americans. HIS participation In the planning of the September 1 lath attacks will forever mark him as evil. Should people. Like Orchards Maidenhead, who make positive or perhaps even neutral comments about terrorists like Bin Laden be fired from endorsement employment? Maybe dismissal from your school as a student? This is a very difficult subject to comment on because I remember hearing about this story with Mr.. Maidenhead but, from a business standpoint everything they did, I would’ve done.

Saying comments like that on social networks when you are followed by hundreds of thousands of people reflects you and any company you work for. Even if it’s Just your opinion, like it was in this case, he still reflected the company and people might think differently of his company. It may cause people to think that is what the company thinks of the situation. I do not however think its grounds for dismissal from a school though. 4) Very few people would question the service and commitment of military personnel to our country.

The two sergeants who created the Youth video openly criticized delta Airlines for its charging of baggage fees to military personnel. Is the open form of criticism of businesses and their practices acceptable? Will it help businesses be more accountable to customers? Yes it’s acceptable because people should be able to see how customers are criticizing a company. If they are not allowed to see some of the potential problems they could end up facing how would hey really know if they wanted to purchase from them. Plus with the bad criticism good will come.

Yes it will help businesses more accountable to their customers because they will have to fix the problems and know what they’re doing well so that they can continue to do so. 5) The use of Backbone (or any other social networking site) can truly make a person’s life transparent, available for the whole world to see. Should there be legislating regulation the openness of your life on the internet? Can we expect society somehow to regulate this without any laws? I don’t think that there would be any type of regulation on the internet because people should be able to share with everybody whatever they want to.

The more open somebody is, the more they will be willing to share. So who are we to put limits on what somebody can share to their friends, family, and the world. Not really because the only way that society will regulate what is put on the internet is if society was to be on the same page, which I feel we are not. Some people think there should be limits while others do not. Everybody is brought up on their own communities norms and values, which will determine what they think is socially fitting.

Case study Essay – Part 4

Case Problem 1: Young Professional Magazine

1.Descriptive Statistics for the quantitative variables follow:

We will write a custom essay sample on
Case study
specifically for you for only $13.9/page

Order now

More Essay Examples on Statistics Rubric

Variable N Mean SE Mean StDev Minimum Maximum Skewness Age 410 30.112 0.199 4.024 19.000 42.000 -0.03

Investments 410 28538 781 15811 0.000 133400 1.71

Transactions 410 5.973 0.153 3.101 0.000 21.000 1.21

Household Income 410 74460 1720 34818 16200 322500 2.01

Descriptive statistics for the qualitative variables follow:

GenderMale: 229Proportion male:.5585

Plan R.E – Case study Essay introduction. purchaseYes:181Proportion yes:.4415

Broadband accessYes:256Proportion yes:.6244

Have ChildrenYes:219Proportion yes:.5341

2.95% Confidence Intervals

Variable N Mean StDev SE Mean 95% CI Age 410 30.1122 4.0240 0.1987 (29.7215, 30.5029)

Variable N Mean StDev SE Mean 95% CI Household Income 410 74459.5 34818.2 1719.5 (71079.3, 77839.8)

We can conclude with 95% confidence that the mean age of subscribers to

Young Professional is between 29.72 and 30.50 years of age. And, we can conclude with 95% confidence that the mean household income of subscribers is between $71,079 and $77,840.

3.95% Confidence Intervals

Variable X N Sample p 95% CI

Broadband Access 256 410 0.624390 (0.577514, 0.671266)

Variable X N Sample p 95% CI

Have Children? 219 410 0.534146 (0.485861, 0.582431)

We can conclude with 95% confidence that the proportion of subscribers with broadband access is between 57.75% and 67.13% and that the proportion of subscribers with children is between 48.59% and 58.24%.

4. Young Professional should be a good advertising outlet for online brokers. We see that most of the subscribers have financial investments exclusive of their home (the mean amount is $28,538) and some of them have a substantial amount of investments. (Several have over $100,000 of investments). Another factor to consider is the number of stock, bond, and mutual fund transactions. The mean number is approximately 6 per year and several subscribers make significantly more transactions than that. Finally a large proportion of subscribers have broadband access (the sample proportion is .6244) and this makes them more likely to do business with an online broker. 5.The survey results allow us to estimate that the mean age of subscribers is 30.12 years and that 53.41% of subscribers have children. Given the age of subscribers, it is reasonable to assume that their children are young. Thus, we conclude that subscribers to Young Professional would be a good target market for companies selling educational software and computer games for young children.

6.A variety of answers are possible here. But, from the survey results, it seems clear that articles about investing would have appeal to many readers. Articles about real estate and architecture would probably appeal to those subscribers planning to make a real estate purchase. Technology related articles would probably appeal to readers as well as an occasional article on parenting and child care.

Case Problem 2: Gulf Real Estate Properties

The variables are as follows:

GV ListThe list price of a Gulf View condominium

GV SaleThe sale price of the Gulf View condominium

GV DaysThe number of days to sell the Gulf View condominium

NGV ListThe list price of a No Gulf View condominium

NGV SaleThe sale price of the No Gulf View condominium

NGV DaysThe number of days to sell the No Gulf View condominium

1/2.The results obtained using Minitab are as follows:

Descriptive Statistics: GV List, GV Sale, GV Days, NGV List, NGV Sale, NGV Days

Variable N Mean Median TrMean StDev SE Mean GV List 40 474.0 437.0 462.0 197.3 31.2 GV Sale 40 454.2 417.5 441.2 192.5 30.4 GV Days 40 106.00 96.00 102.64 52.22 8.26 NGV List 18 212.8 212.5 210.0 48.9 11.5 NGV Sale 18 203.2 203.5 201.8 43.9 10.3 NGV Days 18 135.0 126.0 127.8 76.3 18.0

Variable Minimum Maximum Q1 Q3

GV List 169.9 975.0 332.7 551.9

GV Sale 165.0 975.0 314.3 530.6

GV Days 28.00 282.00 71.25 138.75

NGV List 148.0 322.0 174.9 241.0

NGV Sale 135.5 292.5 172.4 230.0

NGV Days 48.0 338.0 62.5 154.8

3.Gulf View condominiums are the more expensive as usually anticipated. A Gulf View condominium lists for a mean price of $474,000 and a median price of $437,000. A No Gulf View condominium lists for a mean price of $212,800 and a median price of $212,500. The Gulf View condominiums are over twice as expensive as the No Gulf View condominiums.

The standard deviation of the list price for Gulf View condominiums is $197,300 and the standard deviation of the list price for No Gulf View condominiums is $48,900. Thus, the Gulf View condominiums have a greater variation in list price.

The most expensive list-price is for a Gulf View condominium at $975,000 while the least expensive list-price is a No Gulf View condominium at $148,000.

A Box Plot shows that the No Gulf View condominiums do not have any outliers. A similar box plot shows the highest four Gulf View list prices are outliers: $885,000, $895,000 and two at $975,000. These show 4/40 or 10% of the Gulf View condominiums have an unusually high list price.

The mean number of days to sell a condominium is slightly better for Gulf View condominiums than for No Gulf View condominiums (106 days vs. 135 days). On average, it appears to take a little over three months to sell a Gulf View condominium and a little over four months to sell a No Gulf View condominium. The quickest sale was a Gulf View condominium that sold in less than a month (28 days). The slowest sale was for a No Gulf View condominium that took almost a year to sell (338 days).

Gulf View condominiums with a mean list price of $474,000 and a mean sale price of $454,200 sell on average $474,000 – $454,200 = $19,800 (4.2%) below list price. No Gulf View condominiums with a mean list price of $212,800 and a mean sale price of $203,200 appears to sell on average $212,800 – $203,200 = $9,600 (4.5%) below list price. There is only a small percentage difference in list and sale price for the two types of condominiums.

In summary, Gulf View condos are substantially more expensive and tend to sell slightly faster. The discount off the list price is roughly 4.0 to 4.5% for both Gulf View and No Gulf View condos.

4.Using the Minitab 1-Sample t procedure

Variable N Mean StDev SE Mean 95.0% CI GV Sale 40 454.2 192.5 30.4 ( 392.7, 515.8) GV Days 40 106.00 52.22 8.26 ( 89.30, 122.70)

95% Confidence Intervals:

Gulf View Mean Sales Price$392,700 to $515,800

Gulf View Mean Days to Sell 89 to 123

5.Using the Minitab 1-Sample t procedure

Variable N Mean StDev SE Mean 95.0% CI NGV Sale 18 203.2 43.9 10.3 ( 181.4, 225.0) NGV Days 18 135.0 76.3 18.0 ( 97.1, 172.9)

95% Confidence Intervals:

No Gulf View Mean Sales Price$181,400 to $225,000

No Gulf View Mean Days to Sell 97 to 173

6.Gulf View condominiums

With n = 40, the margin of error is $59,600. To reduce the margin of error to $40,000 the recommended sample size.

No Gulf View condominiums

With n = 18, the margin of error is $21,800. To reduce the margin of error to $15,000 the recommended sample size.

7.From part 3, a Gulf View condominium sells on average 4.2% below its list price.

The estimated selling price is $589,000 x .958 = $564,262. Using the mean days, it is estimated to sell in about 106 days.

From part 3, a No Gulf View condominium sells on average 4.5% below its list price.

The estimated selling price is $285,000 x .955 = $272,175. Using the mean days, it is estimated to sell in about 135 days.